Also, as well as and too….same?

Position
Also, as well and too have similar meanings, but they do not go in the same
position in clauses.
Also usually goes with the verb, in mid-position (see 24);
as well and too usually go at the end of a clause. As well is less common in
AmE.
She not only sings; she also plays the piano.
She not only sings; she plays the piano as well.
She not only sings; she plays the piano too.

As well and too do not go at the beginning of a clause. Also can go at the
beginning of a clause to give more importance to a new piece of information.
It’s a nice house, but it’s very small. Also, it needs a lot of repairs.

Reference
These words can refer to different parts of a clause, depending on the
meaning. Consider the sentence:

We work on Saturdays as well.

This can mean three different things:
1. (Other people work on Saturdays, and) we work on Saturdays as well.
2. (We do other things on Saturdays, and) we work on Saturdays as well.
3. (We work on other days, and) we work on Saturdays as well.

When we speak, we show the exact meaning by stressing the word or
expression that
also / as well / too refers to.

Imperatives and short answers

As well and too are used in imperatives and short answers, but not usually also.
Give me some bread as well, please.
(More natural than Also give me … )
She’s nice. ~ Her sister is as well.
(More natural than Her sister is also.)
I’ve got a headache. ~ I have too.
(More natural than I also have.)

In very informal speech, we often use Me too as a short answer.
I’m going home. ~ Me too.

More formal equivalents are So am I  or I am too, BUT NOT I-also.

In a formal or literary style, too can be placed directly after the subject.
I, too, have experienced despair.

Also, as well, too and either in negative clauses

After mentioning a negative idea or fact, we can add another negative point by using not … either.
Peter isn’t here today.
John isn’t here either. (NOT John isn’t here neither.)

Also, as well and too are not normally used with not in this way.
You can’t have an apple, and you can’t have an orange either.
(NOT … and you can’t have an orange–  also/ as well/ too)

After mentioning an affirmative (non-negative) fact or idea, we can add a
negative point by using
not … also, not … as well or not … too.
You can have an apple, but you can’t have an orange too.
He drinks too much, but at least he doesn’t smoke as well.

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