Category: Practical English hints

How to use ‘but’

use We use but to mean ‘except’ after all, none, every, any, no (and everything, everybody, nothing, nobody, anywhere etc). He eats nothing but hamburgers. Everybody’s here but George. I’ve finished all the jobs but one. Note the expressions next...

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broad and wide

physical distance To talk about the physical distance from one side of something to the other, we more often use wide. We live in a very wide street. The car’s too wide for the garage. Broad can also be used...

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Most used Phrasal Verbs

Phrasal Verb    Meaning                                        Back away! move backward, away from something frightening or dangerous Back off! (slang – rude) stop bothering...

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Bring or Take?

bring and take speaker’s/hearer’s position We use bring for movements to the place where the speaker or hearer is, but we use take for movements to other places. Compare:  This is a nice restaurant. Thanks for bringing me here. (N...

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How to use Both

Both Both means ‘each of two’. Both my parents were born in Scotland. We do not normally use both when the meaning is not ‘each‘. My two brothers carried the piano upstairs. (More natural than Both my brothers carried the...

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Between or Among?

between two We say that something is between two people, things, or groups of things. She was standing between Alice and Mary. a long valley between high mountains Between is often used to talk about distances or intervals. We need...

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How to use: Bet

I bet (you) can be used in an informal style to mean ‘I think it’s probable that‘. That is usually dropped. I bet (you) she’s not at home. (More natural than I bet (you) that she’s not at home.) I’ll...

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